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Why I Refuse To Be Bullied Into Caring About John McCain’s Death

The death of John McCain has caused an uproar on social media that triggered a heated debate over the American values represented by the Republican politician and military veteran. While some commended McCain’s patriotism, others questioned his moral integrity. Here we go again, extremely polarizing EVERYTHING in our society today, why would this be any different?

Look…I get why people are calling him a patriot.  I understand they have not a freaking clue about the globalist NWO agenda and John McCain’s role in selling out America and the deaths of innocents as a result of McCain’s support for this agenda.  However, just because I understand why people react the way they do is not enough to silence me.  I’m getting so sick of this, “Unfriend me if you feel this way….or that….etc” posts on social media.

It’s like watching grown adults throw temper tantrums. It’s clear we have a serious communication issue in our society when we can’t even talk about pertinent issues because someone gets offended or interprets it as disrespect for our country/military. Over the years, McCain advocated for military intervention in a number of countries including Bosnia, Kosovo, Georgia, North Korea, Iraq, Afghanistan, Iran, Syria, Kuwait, Libya, Nigeria, and Mali.

“If you are a non-interventionist, you should already know that McCain was a war monger, in the pocket of military industrial complex and is responsible for hundreds of thousands of dead. He meddled for war in the Middle East and Ukraine. He was an evil, entitled, heartless man,” one user tweeted.

On September 12th, 2001, McCain appeared on MSNBC presenting an extensive list of countries he felt were providing a “safe harbor” to groups like al Qaeda. This list, of course, included Iraq and several other nations that appear later on this list.

Syria

Shortly after the Arab Spring “broke out” in Syria, McCain – and his constant partner in war crimes Sen. Lindsey Graham – quickly found communication channels with the “Syrian opposition.”

Just a few short months after the US endorsed protests in Syria (even having their ambassador attend), McCain and Graham began calling for arms to start flowing to the Free Syrian Army and other “rebel” groups.

Libya

It was less than a year before McCain wanted to arm Syrian takfiris that he had supported with the bombing and no-fly zones in Libya. McCain even wanted tougher actions against the country. Which has now become an anarchic Wild West that’s home to all sorts of horrors from the Islamic State to a new slave trade.

West and Central Africa

While McCain hasn’t directly supported terrorists in some countries in Africa, he still has called for more US intervention across the continent. This list includes countries dealing with Islamic insurgencies, such as Mali. McCain has also called for plans like “deploying Special Forces” to rescue girls kidnapped by Boko Haram in Nigeria and intervention in Sudan, where McCain and his wife have invested money for some time.

Iran

Although McCain has always said “he prays” there will never be a war with Iran, he even jokes about bombing the country when he feels the mood is right. The truth of the matter is, McCain’s positions towards Iran are so hostile that even flagship neoconservative institutions like the Cato Institute think he is too hawkish.

Bosnia and Kosovo

He’s also backed violent radicals across the fringes of Europe. This actually started in the mid-1990’s when McCain was a vocal supporter of then-president Bill Clinton’s war in Bosnia. Many Muslims traveling to Bosnia joining the mujahideen there have since joined groups like IS in recent years. And IS flags can occasionally be seen in the Sunni areas of Bosnia now. McCain was still backing potential Takfiri movements, recently accusing Russia of interfering in local affairs, and calling for more US intervention in the country.

Ukraine

He also backs the overt Nazis acting as death squads for Kiev in the ongoing Ukrainian conflict. McCain has continued to pledge support for Kiev’s crimes in the Donbass region to this day.

Russia

The story of McCain’s hatred of Russia spans back to the Cold War. We won’t get into McCain’s fear of communism that’s evolved into just general Russophobia. But we will say he didn’t have many excuses to focus on making threats towards Moscow for a good 15-20 year stretch. This changed in 2008, with the war in South Ossetia between Georgia and Russia. During this conflict, McCain was the loudest voice saying the US “should immediately call a meeting of the North Atlantic Council to assess Georgia’s security and review measures NATO can take to contribute to stabilizing this very dangerous situation.”

As soon as the US Intelligence Community’s accused Russia of interference in the 2016 US elections– and without any evidence – McCain was first to say the event was an “act of war.” He even warned Trump not to make peace with Russia.

North Korea

The Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DRPK/North Korea) was also an early target of McCain’s making his September 12th wish list. More recently though, the restyled “Trump opponent” McCain was all-in on the new regime’s saber rattling. Calling on Trump to strike the nuclear-armed country.

The next time someone asks why you don’t care about John McCain’s clock running out, show them this article. McCain has encouraged the spread of death worldwide. I refuse to waste any amount of emotional energy paying respects or mourning the guy.  This is the result of military worship in America.  People need to wake up and stop idolizing war criminals as “patriots.”  Didn’t JFK warn us of “infiltration instead of invasion”?  How many times throughout history have prominent individuals said if America falls it will be from within?

Source:

http://humansarefree.com/2018/08/john-mccain-dead-at-81-he-was-globalist.html



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